Blog Archives

Richard Dawkins Welcomes Ratzinger

Joseph Ratzinger is an enemy of humanity.

He’s an enemy of children, whose bodies he’s allowed to be raped and whose minds he’s encouraged to be infected with guilt. It’s embarrassingly clear that the church is less concerned with saving child bodies from rapists than with saving priestly souls from hell. And most concerned with saving the longterm reputation of the church itself.

He’s an enemy of gay people. Bestowing on them the sort of bigotry that his church used to reserve for Jews before 1962.

He’s an enemy of women, barring them from the priesthood as though a penis were an essential tool for pastoral duties.

He’s an enemy of truth, promoting barefaced lies about condoms not protecting against AIDS, especially in Africa.

He’s an enemy of the poorest people on the planet, condemning them to inflated families they cannot feed and so keeping them in the bondage of perpetual poverty. A poverty which sits ill beside the obscene wealth of the Vatican.

He’s an enemy of science. Obstructing vital stem cell research on grounds, not of true morality, but on pre-scientific superstition.

Ratzinger is even an enemy of the Queen’s own church, arrogantly dissing Anglican orders as “absolutely null and utterly void,” while at the same time shamelessly trying to poach Anglican vicars to shore up his own pitifully declining priesthood.

Finally, perhaps of most personal concern to me, Ratzinger is an enemy of education. Quite apart from the lifelong psychological damage caused by the guilt and fear that have made Catholic education infamous throughout the world, he and his church foster the educationally pernicious doctrine that evidence is a less reliable basis for belief than faith, tradition, revelation, and authority. His authority.

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Forgive my Gay Politics for a Moment; Good news

Three pieces of potentially good news on the National Front for Gay Rights and AIDS

1.  The US is poised to lift its travel and immigration ban on people with HIV.  This means that people applying to live in the US or visit it will no longer be discriminated against solely because they have AIDS.  Obviously, this is positive for more than just gay men, and will be a good thing for Africans and anyone else with HIV.

2. A vaccine in Thailand reduced HIV transmission by 31%.  While this isn’t enough to market it as a vaccine yet, it is the first indication that an HIV vaccine is even possible.

3. Since 1994, Congress has been trying to pass ENDA, the Employee Non-Discrimination Act, which would prevent employers from discriminating based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity has the best chance yet of getting passed. In 29 states, it’s legal to fire someone because they’re gay and in 38 states, it’s legal to fire someone for being transgender.